Proper 9 (14),Third Sunday after Pentecost

July 3, 2011: Song of Songs 2:8-13; Matthew 11:16-19, 25-30

Song of Solomon 2:8-13:
“The voice of my beloved!
Look, he comes, leaping upon the mountains,
bounding over the hills.
9 My beloved is like a gazelle or a young stag.
Look, there he stands behind our wall,
Gazing in at the windows,
Looking through the lattice.
10 My beloved speaks and says to me:
“Arise my love, my fair one and come away;
11 for now the winter is past, the rain is over and gone.
12 The flowers appear on the earth, the time of singing has come
and the voice of the turtledove is heard in our land.
13 The fig tree puts forth its figs and the vines are in blossom;
they give forth fragrance.
Arise, my love my fair one and come away.”


Matthew 11:16-19, 25-30: “But to what will I compare this generation? It is like children sitting in the marketplace and calling to one another,

17 “We played the flute for you and you did not dance;
we wailed and you did not mourn.”
18 For John came neither eating nor drinking and they say, “He has a demon; 19 the Son of Man came eating and drinking and they say, “Look, a glutton and a drunkard, a friend of tax collectors and sinners!” Yet wisdom is vindicated by her deeds.”

…25 At that time Jesus said, “I thank you Father, Lord of heaven and earth because you have hidden these things from the wise and the intelligent and have revealed them to infants; 26 yes, Father, for such was your gracious will. 27 All things have been handed over to me by my Father; no one knows the Son except the Father and no one knows the Father except the Son and anyone to whom the Son chooses to reveal him. 28 “Come to me all you that are weary and are carrying heavy burdens and I will give you rest. 29 Take my yoke upon you and learn of me; for I am gentle and humble in hearty and you will find rest for your souls. 30 For my yoke is easy and my burden is light.”

Proper 9 (14),Third Sunday after Pentecost Comment
This past Tuesday, June 28, 2011, the Roman Catholic Liturgy honored Irenaeus. Irenaeus lived (c. 125—c. 203 AD). He was the third generation from those who knew Jesus. Like holding and reading the discharge paper of civil war soldier, which I was privileged to do and knowing……..

Irenaeus was famous for refuting the prevailing cultural philosophy that had crept into the church. This philosophy was called, Gnosticism. Of the many teachings and they were many, one was an Elitist Doctrine, which taught that a person with the correct knowledge or special revelation, following the right rituals would come to know the perfect, but unknown God. John the Baptizer and Jesus as described in the gospel text would never qualify. However, Jesus’ call in verse 28 and 29 is to all without any other qualification except that they are weary or burdened. The invitation, with your name written on it reads…

“Arise my love, my fair one and come away;
for now the winter is past, the rain is over and gone.
The flowers appear on the earth, the time of singing has come
and the voice of the turtledove is heard in our land.
The fig tree puts forth its figs and the vines are in blossom;
they give forth fragrance.
Arise, my love my fair one and come away.”

Seeking Extraordinary Blessings in Ordinary Time,
Rev. Julia
© July 2, 2011

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